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Posted on Jul 9, 2012 in Worship Ministry, Worship Ministry Catalyst

Top 5 Blogs/Forums for Guitarists

Top 5 Blogs/Forums for Guitarists

Okay, even though we know that piano is by far the most holy and spiritual instrument for worship, I know a lot of you play some of the lesser instruments. That’s okay, we’re still here to support you in your endeavor. Maybe one day you will aspire to learn the intricacies of such a holy instrument as the piano, but until then, we want to help you use the gifts you have in the best possible way, for God’s Kindgom! (If you disagree, tell me on our facebook page!)

One huge area of Worship Ministry that has really exploded over the last 10 years or so is the area of guitars in worship. I remember acoustic guitar being a big deal back in the 90’s with all the early vineyard and Maranatha! stuff. But there wasn’t a ton of electric guitar until later. Sure there were pockets of worship that had probably been using guitars in worship for a long time, it wasn’t the main thing until just recently.

I have to say that, even as a piano guy, I’m stoked to see just how far we’ve come in the area of guitar for worship. I do have to say though, that I’m kind of surprised by the lack of content out there – at least in the area of Guitar for worship. There are a few great resources, but there is certainly room out there for a few more blogs and podcasts! (Hint – if you’re know a lot about using guitars in worship Start a blog!!!!)

www.guitarforworship.com – By far the best site with the best content for guitarists who want to use their gifts in worship and for the Kingdom. (Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/guitar4worship)

Guitar for Worship is designed to help musicians (specifically guitarists) best utilize their gifts for God’s glory. There’s tone discussions, gear reviews, technique and mindset articles, and quite possibly a few random musings. There will also be dates for worship guitar workshops, which I hold at my church from time to time.

http://www.theworshipcommunity.com/7-tips-for-leading-worship-on-acoustic-guitar/ (Do a site search for guitar and you’ll find a lot of great resources – unfortunately there is not guitar category to help you find the guitar resources.) (Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/theworshipcomm)

http://www.musicademy.com/category/free-worship-resources/guitar-worship/ – They have a lot of great worship resources for a lot of areas of worship, this is the category for their worship guitar stuff! (Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/musicademy)

http://www.guitarmann.com/categories/blog (mostly video tutorials for guitarists) (Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/guitarmann)

http://www.praiseandworshipforum.com/forum/

 

These are a couple of extras. They’re not geared towards worship, but might prove helpful to you!

http://www.tgpwebzine.com/ (Not specifically for worship, but appears to be very helpful and current)

http://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php? (Also not necessarily for worship, but helpful)

 

Of course, if you know of other guitar for worship blogs, please leave links to them in the comment section!!!

 

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Posted on Jun 7, 2012 in Worship Ministry, Worship Ministry Catalyst

Top 20 Worship Blogs

Top 20 Worship Blogs

One of my goals, is to help equip Worship Leaders and Worship Team members to do their ministry in the best possible way. I wish I knew everything there was to know about Worship Ministry, but unfortunately, I do not. And that’s ok. It’s ok that you don’t know either. But, here are a few people who know worship ministry too, and I think you will benefit from reading their wisdom too!

Worship Matters (http://www.worshipmatters.com/)

The Worship Community which is run by: Fred McKinnon

leadworship.com (not a blog) & Paul Baloche’s Blog.

Chris from Canada (http://www.chrisfromcanada.com/)

Musicademy (http://www.musicademy.com/blog/)

Alastair Vance (http://alastairvance.com/)

Jordan Fowler (http://www.jordanpfowler.com/)

Richkirkpatrick.com & tehillamusic.com & http://worshipmythbusters.com/

I Am An Offering (http://iamanoffering.com/blog/)

Worship Together Blog (http://blog.worshiptogether.com/worshiptogether/)

All about Worship (http://www.allaboutworship.com)

Worship.com (http://worship.com)

Worship Ministry (http://www.worshipministry.com/)

Votive Praise (http://www.votivepraise.com/)

Worship Tools (http://yourworshiptools.com/)

Worship Team Training (http://www.worshipteamtraining.com/)

Ministry Matters (http://www.ministrymatters.com/worship/)

Dan Leverence (http://www.middlebrained.com/)

Jason Sears (www.jasonsears.com)

Should you be on the list? Leave your link in a comment!

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Posted on May 31, 2012 in Worship Ministry Catalyst

10 reasons you should like us on facebook

Top ten reasons you should like Worship Ministry Catalyst on Facebook:

10. Kevin Kruse is now on facebook.

9.  When you like us, the facebook  fairy waves a magic wand over your personal profile, protecting you from spammers.

8. When you like us, you have a page that you can click to quickly when someone comes in your office, so it doesn’t look like you just play around on facebook all day.

7. When you like us, you are helping to save the planet. Not sure how, but in some way…

6. When we get to 1,000 likes, we will be one away from having 1,001 likes.

5. It gives you another reason to check facebook all day long.

4. You can be the first of all your friends to do it, then brag about it later.

3. It will show your worship team that you really are trying to be the best you can be.

2. Your mom said to do it.

1. We would love to have you join the discussion. We are all in this thing called worship ministry together and the more we can support and encourage one another, the better off we will all be. We aren’t called to do worship ministry in a vacuum, we have a community of worship leaders around the world we can all learn from. When you join the conversation, you make the table a little bit bigger, supporting the work of the Kingdom around the world!

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Posted on Dec 29, 2011 in Worship Ministry Catalyst

Been a little busy…

It seems that every year I write a post like this. I should just copy and paste from previous years! However, I just wanted to let you all know that we are still here. Kevin & I have both been busy this Christmas season. We both had Christmas productions as well as regular weekend services and Christmas Eve/Day services.

I hope our absence of content for the past month or so only reinforces who we are in your minds! As we have said all along, we don’t claim to know everything there is to know about Worship Ministry. We’re just a couple of worship pastors who want to share what we do know with the goal of helping you in anyway we can!

Since, I’m assuming, you’ve been busy too, I hope this post informs you that you haven’t missed anything.

The good news is that Kevin & I will be meeting this coming week to record a couple of new episodes of the podcast, so we will have one for you in the near future. Until then, listen to some of the old episodes if you need a fix!

Also, if you need something to do, we’d love it if you could like us on facebook!

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year!

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Posted on Oct 11, 2011 in Worship Ministry, Worship Ministry Catalyst

Get the Evangelism Monkey off the back of Worship

He’s a cute little guy. But he sure can cause a lot of problems.

Don’t get me wrong.

Evangelism is what we’re all about.

YES, we want to be relevant. I agree completely!

But….(and you knew it was coming)…..evangelism cannot ride on the back of worship.

We have to stop trying to make worship – evangelism. Worship is worship, evangelism is evangelism. I agree that a worshiping church is attractive to a non-believer. Far more than a non-worshiping church. I also agree that we want to be conscious of evangelism when it comes to worship. But, we as worship leaders, can’t allow evangelism to determine our worship.

We must choose our worship based on what helps our congregation worship, not on what we think will draw in the lost. Let’s be real, we’re not going to do music that they truly like anyway. Most of us don’t play songs from the top 40 in our worship services. Some do, but most don’t.

Two simple things happen when we try to combine the two:

1. Worship is Diluted.

God wants our worship. It’s that simple. When we try to turn evangelism into worship, it becomes less about worshiping God and more about attracting the lost. We want to be focused in our worship. God and God alone.

2. Evangelism is Marginalized.

When we’re trying to do worship and attach evangelism to it, evangelism becomes marginalized. We can’t focus on both. And, honestly, it becomes too easy to say that we as a church are doing evangelism, when in fact, all we are doing is worship.

Again, let me reiterate, Evangelism is what we’re all about. We have to be about reaching the lost. But, if we’re going to do evangelism, let’s do it all the way. Let’s design services and events around that purpose entirely. “Our people won’t go for that” you might say. “Lead them” I say.

When a service is a worship service, let’s worship.

(To hear more on this topic, check out episode 0093 of the podcast.)

Agree? Disagree? Why?

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Posted on Mar 17, 2011 in Leadership, Worship Ministry Catalyst

Leading a Band Rehearsal

We don’t have that much time. If you’re one of the lucky ones you have a mid-week rehearsal, then you’ve got two rehearsals to get 5, 6, 7 or more songs ready for a bunch of people to hear. And they’re not just going to hear them, they have to be good enough that they don’t distract people from worship. If you’re not that lucky, you have one rehearsal – maybe on the morning of your service – to get everything ready.

How do we do it?

First, use tools that help your people prepare ahead of time.

If you listen to our podcast, you’ve heard me rave about Planning Center Online (& here). Give your team members as many different resources as you can come up with. The more tools you give them, the better the chance they will use one of them. Even better, there’s a chance they will use more than one. And if they use more than one, they’ll be better prepared. If you don’t use planning center, then get your team members charts as early as possible, get them recordings if you can – or links to recordings.

One great resource is YouTube. There are a lot of YouTube videos that actually show the different band members how to play their part of the song. There are other great ways & ideas to help people be prepared – too many to talk about here. (Feel free to comment below with what you do!) The idea is, do as much as you can.

Second – Give them the big picture.

Let them hear the whole song if you have a recording. Of course this brings up a philosophical dilemma for some of us. You know who you are. Some of you like using a recording of how someone else has done the song isn’t musical or creative. If you’re not one of those, play them the recording – more than once. I play the recording a time or two, and then usually play the intro again to get everyone started.

If you are one of “those” – talk them through the song. Make sure your chart has as much detail as possible, and that they have the chart in front of them. Then talk them through the song. Tell them where they’re in & where they’re out. Give them rhythms & syncopations.

But don’t talk too long.  The more you talk, the less time the band will have to play. And the more they’re playing, the more they’ll be familiar with the songs. The more reps they get in, the better off they & you will be. They’ll be more confident and make fewer mistakes. That’s why it’s important to put as much information on the chart as you can. It will save you explanation time, and get you to playing music quicker.

Then play through the whole song as a band. Don’t stop to fix stuff yet. Just get through the song. You’ll want to stop and fix the problems, but don’t. Pay attention to the problems and where they were so you can come back & fix them, but don’t stop to fix them yet. If you have a train wreck, stop, tell everyone where you are and get going again. Once you’ve gotten through the song, then you can start to woodshed.

Three – Woodshed.

Now it’s time to focus on the problem spots. Work the Introduction to the song, work through the verse, then work the chorus, the bridge & outro. If someone has a question, let them ask it. Ask for questions here. Do as much as you can to put everyone at ease.

But don’t spend too much time. If you’re doing 5 songs, and you have a two hour rehearsal, you have about 12-15 minutes max to spend on each song. You’ll want to leave yourself time to run through everything at the end, pray, etc.

Four – Work your transitions.

If you’re transitioning straight from one song to the next, you’ll want to have some kind of musical transition to get from the end of one song to the beginning of the next. You don’t want to have to stop & start each time you move to a new song. You want to move between songs as smoothly as possible. When you stop, you might as well be saying “Hey – we just finished a song, and we’re about to start the next one – but we need a minute to change this or that. Okay we’re ready to start….” Because if you don’t, they’re thinking it.

Five – Put it all together.

Run through the whole set, in order, with all your transitions. Don’t stop to fix things. You won’t be able to stop during your service, so if you can do it without stopping now, you’ll do it better in the service. Make sure your tech crew are running through everything as well – not off getting coffee or something.

A few additional notes on leading a rehearsal.

Don’t waste time. Do your best to have everything read before hand. If you can’t have everything ready, hurry. Don’t walk, run.

Be decisive. Listen to your team, especially their creative input (they need to know that you hear them when they make a suggestion – they’re putting themselves out there & we need to honor that) but, you are the one in charge. You have to decide, and you have to decide quick. You’ve had more time with the music/songs. You’re probably more familiar with them than they will be for a long time. You know how the song should feel, so you should be able to decide quickly.

Make sure everyone can hear you. You need to be able to “direct” people, and to direct them they need to be able to hear you.When you’re in the woodshedding phase – you need to stop quickly. If you can’t be heard, you won’t stop quick enough.

Of course there’s more that could be said, but this is long enough already. Feel free to leave your tips in the comments section below.

 

Photo by: http://denispepin.com

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