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Posted on Mar 4, 2016 in Blog, Church, Dear Leader, Featured, Humility, Leadership, Unity

An Open Letter to Andy Stanley From the Pastor of a Small Church

An Open Letter to Andy Stanley From the Pastor of a Small Church

Dear Andy,

First off, I love you. Seriously. I’ve spent a lot of time studying your way of doing things. I’ve been an Andy Stanley champion for a decade. I’ve bought your books and ready them. Some of them more than once. There is great insight in them for up and coming pastors like myself. I’ve used your podcasts, I’ve bought books you’ve recommended on your leadership podcast. I’ve loved having you as a source of wisdom and input into my ministry since I discovered you in 2005. So, I feel like I’ve known you for over a decade.

Second, I don’t normally write these kinds of posts. I generally try to write posts that will help the people I know and lead be better disciples. Most of them don’t know about Andy’s remarks, and probably never would. But, in this instance I feel compelled to respond. And, I feel like I may have something to offer you for a change. And, I’m hoping you’ll hear me. Chances aren’t great you’ll ever read this letter, but it’s worth a shot. I’m not anti-mega church like so many. We can disagree without hating each other, right? More on that later.

Third, my intent in writing this letter is to share with other pastors of small churches some of the things I’ve learned – which is being pointed out by the response to your comments. I was offended, though I’m trying not to be.

Recently, you preached a sermon at your church, where you spoke ill of small churches. And from the outcry I’ve seen on Facebook and Twitter, you’ve had your hands full dealing with the backlash as a result. (The video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZhhpiU4d0A). I’m sure that’s not been fun. But, I’m also sure you’re learning a lot from it. At least, I hope you are.

Since you were pretty direct and blunt in your remarks, I’ll just go ahead and be blunt and direct in my response as well. You said some pretty stupid things in that sermon. I get where you were coming from, but I think you probably could have been a little more careful. I’ll be honest. I didn’t go watch the whole sermon. I didn’t care to after what I saw and heard. I’ve listened to a lot of your sermons over the years. I’ve shared them with my friends, family and church.

Along with being the pastor of a small church, I’ve worked in several mid-sized to large churches as well. So, in part, I understand both worlds. Not to the level you do, but I get more than many. That said, I’m not one of those “mega churches are evil” people. I see you reach a lot of people for the kingdom. And I thank God for what you and so many other mega churches are able to do.

But there were some words that are going to be hard to get over. And as a result, will change the amount of influence I’ll allow you to have in my life and ministry in the future. I refuse to write you off, but my pursuit of your teaching will be a little more tempered.

These are a few of the quotes from the snipet I saw.

“If you don’t go to a church large enough where you can have enough middle schoolers and high schoolers to separate them so they can have small groups and grow up the local church, you are a selfish adult, get over it. Find yourself a big ‘ol church where your kids can connect with a bunch of people and grow up and love the local church.”

“You drag your kids to a church they hate, and then they grow up and hate the local church.”

“Don’t attend a church that teaches your children to hate church.”

As is so often said nowadays, it’s not just what you said, it’s also how you said it. It wasn’t just a comment that was made in passing. It was a remark that you spent time preparing. I decipher this based on the point you wrote out on your screen. “Don’t attend a church that teaches your children to hate church.” I know you work on your sermons well in advance, you’ve said you work on three sermons at a time at one of your earlier drive conferences. So, You probably worked on this sermon for a few weeks. So, it’s hard for me to imagine this was off the cuff and not well thought out. Because that’s not you. And, the manner with which you made these remarks show that you are very passionate about what you said. And, I guess if that’s your strategy, you should be passionate. But, what if you’re wrong? In fact, you’ve said “Your beliefs shape your attitudes.” Perhaps this is why you spoke with such passion.

Does your, phrase that pays principle apply to your church? If your church is teaching children to hate church, should people choose a different church? Isn’t it also selfish for parents to drag their kids to your church if they hate your church?

You’ve also said, “It is when our hearts are stirred that we become most aware of what they contain.” (Source: It came from within! The The Shocking Truth of What lurks in the Heart). Is that what your heart contains, complete disdain for all us small churches out in the world struggling and wishing we had the resources you have at your disposal?

I don’t pretend to know the pressure and scrutiny you are under as a mega leader in the American Christian church. I can’t imagine having so many people scrutinize my sermons and listen for things that can be taken personally. I’m sure I’ve said similarly offensive things, it’s just that there aren’t tens of thousands of church leaders and Christians listening to me.

As you have said: “We don’t drift in good directions. We discipline and prioritize ourselves there.” (Source: The principle of the path) Somewhere along the way, your priorities seem to have gotten a little out of whack. That is, assuming you believe what you said. And that’s why I’m writing this really long letter. Because, maybe it will serve as a catalyst to help you create some disciplines that correct your path for the future. I know that sounds arrogant, but you’ve also said we’re supposed to learn from everyone. That we should be asking good questions.

From reading your books, I don’t think you’ve had a ton of experience leading a small church. North Point was a plant/split from your dad’s church that started with 1,000 people. You may not understand the challenges we small church pastors face. We work on strategy and systems in the same way you do, but we don’t have a pool of thousands of people to draw from the implement the strategy. Often times, if we think something is extremely important and needs to be done, we are the ones who have to get it done.

You may not understand what it’s like to have a megachurch down the street from you, and have people leave your church to go there. You may not understand what it’s like to have friends leave your church because the mega church offers more than your church can imagine. There may be a lot of things you just don’t understand because you’ve never had to lead a small church. And to be honest, I refuse to judge you or condemn you for your lack of knowledge. Instead, I’m hoping you’ll learn from us small church pastors. Because while you have things to teach us, believe it or not, there may be a thing or two you can learn from us. And, to be honest, if you’re not willing to learn from me/us, it’s foolish for me/us to continue to learn from you.

As far as I’m concerned, you’re forgiven. I probably put too much stock in your words anyway. So, it’s also on me that I put myself in a position to be offended by your words. At the same time, it does me not good to carry a grudge against you or any pastor. We have more to learn from one another. And if we can all walk a little more humbly, the Kingdom of God will advance in a much more biblical and unified fashion than we have seen in the past.

To my fellow small church pastors who may be reading this letter, learn from me. Several years ago I realized I was allowing pastors such as Andy Stanley and Matt Chandler among others to have too much influence in my ministry. Learn what you can from them, but be more concerned about what God wants to do through you in the church he has you in. He put YOU there for a reason. If God wanted Andy or Matt to be pastoring your church, God would move them there. Can we learn from them? Absolutely. In fact, to this day, If Andy or Matt were to offer to mentor me as a young pastor, I would still take them up on their offer. I don’t expect that to happen. (How awesome would it be if each Mega church pastor took some young, small church pastors under their wing for a year or two or three – at no cost! After all, do for one what you wish you could do for all – right Andy?) But, let’s stop elevating one another as idols in ministry and be more focused on being and doing who and what God wants for us. And don’t use this as a tool to talk down about other churches. We all know, if they were to scrutinize us in the same fashion, they’d find something to make us look bad too.

Anyway, Andy. Thanks for your apology. It is accepted. (Of course, I know about your apology because I follow you on Twitter, maybe I’ll get lucky enough for you to follow me back someday.) And my hope and prayer is that God will use this in your life to further the mission of the Kingdom of God in our modern day and age, and that this may become a tool that actually unites us and sharpens our attack.

You’re an awesome guy who just happened to offend thousands of other awesome men and women who used to look up to you. It just shows us you’re as human and flawed as we are. Who knows, maybe that’s why you said what you said. But, you may want to think a little more carefully the next time before you say something to drive off all the leaders you’ve been trying to lead for the last 10-12 years.

Thanks for listening,

David

 

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Posted on Apr 22, 2015 in Blog, Church, Dear Leader, Leadership, repost

Dear Leader: Coaching vs. Catering

Dear Leader: Coaching vs. Catering

Dear-LeaderDear Leader,

We live in an interesting tension don’t we? Especially in the church world. I know how you feel. It can be a really big scale to try to balance. On the one hand we’re supposed to be leading people. Yet, at the same time, if we push to hard or offend people, they’ll stop following us.

More often than not, we end up playing it safe. Instead of getting out in front a little farther and working to get our people to follow us, it’s easier to just let them stay where they are.

We imagine ourselves out in front of the pack, blazing the trail that those who come behind us will walk on. But are we doing that? Are we blazing a new trail, coaching our people to come behind us? Or are we standing in the midst of the people, trying to keep them where they are and from taking steps backwards?

I know where most of us end up, because I’ve been there too. It’s so much more comfortable in the middle of the pack. It’s easier to feel like we’re successful when we’re surrounded with the people who have followed us to this point. And if we take that step toward something new, we’ll have to step out of the comfortable spot inside the pack and put ourselves out there in front of the pack.

It’s risky out there in front. It’s dangerous out there, maybe even a little scary. Everyone thinks we know exactly where to go and what to do, but the reality is we’re figuring it out too. We may know a little more than those who are supposed to follow, but we don’t have a crystal ball to use to read the future.

So, every once in a while we get out in front. But, as happens when we start prodding most people to move, there’s a little resistance. And when you add the frustration of resistance to the uncertainty of the future, the sum is a load that can be hard to carry. Too hard.

And it doesn’t get any easier. We think it will get easier if we can get a few more people on board. But the reality is, the more people who follow us just means the more people who can choose to stop following us. And the more people who are following us, the more people who are relying on us to lead them well.

So we retreat to where we have already been. Back into the middle of the pack we go. At least there, we’re relatively safe and the risk is relatively low.

But is it?

What exactly have we been called to do? If we are supposed to be leaders, can we really call ourselves that if we aren’t actually leading our people anywhere? If we’re just trying to keep everyone around us, is that really leading?

Have you ever thought about this? It’s much harder to get a group of people moving than it is to keep them moving. Once a group is in motion, it’s easier to lead. When a group hasn’t moved in a while, it takes an enormous amount of effort and energy to get it moving. The longer it’s been sitting still, the harder it will be.

At the end of the day, what’s need of us most is to lead. We won’t always do it right, we don’t always do it well. But, that’s our job. Yes, we do it in the best way we can so that those who are following us are being cared for. But, we must drop this myth that we can’t lead people and care for people at the same time. In fact, if we really care for people we will really lead people. Forward motion is what’s best for everyone. When is it better to sit without moving? Is it better to sit on the couch or to go on a walk?

So, will you join me in leading? Our job is not to cater to the people around us in the hope that we will keep them. Our job is to coach people as we lead the charge. Our job is to get out in front and figure out where we need to go, and then coach those we are leading on how to take that next step, giving them the helping hand up on the way.

Leaders don’t cater, leaders coach,
David

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Posted on Jan 30, 2015 in Blog, Church, Culture, Dear Leader, Featured, Leadership, Lost Virtues, repost, Truth

How Do We Save The Church?

How Do We Save The Church?

There’s a great blog/podcast for church leaders that I love to follow, Carey Nieuwhof. One of the posts he wrote just before Christmas (http://careynieuwhof.com/2014/12/impending-death-rebirth-cool-church/) really resonated with me. As I’ve been involved with the discussion, I have also realized that I have a lot to say about this particular subject.

So, I thought I’d share it with you.

But, before I begin, let me be clear. I believe in the church. And I don’t like it when Christians tear down other Christians…when churches tear down other churches. This is not going to be that kind of a post. There’s plenty of content like that out there. It won’t take you long to find it.

With that said, I also think we need to be honest about the current state of the church. I don’t think we are doing ourselves any favors by trying to hide what is going on. The church is in decline.

Fighting for our former position in society will do us no good. It will not help if our interest is in “being seen as a Christian nation again.” I understand the desire. I do. But it is sideways energy.

And it is not the way for us to gain influence in our society. But, we’ll get to that in a bit.

Fighting for the former means. 

I have always thought it should be the job of the older and wiser members of a church community who have the depth of understanding to be able to set preference aside. Never setting aside mission. But, set aside their personal preference because they understand the means are the vehicle for connecting with the next generation. I have no problem with a fight to keep the church on mission.

But too often the fight has nothing to do with mission.

too-often-the-fightToo often the fight is centered around personal preference, and it is mission that gets sacrificed. And when mission is the thing that gets put on the back burner, there is a whole pressure cooker of preference that it just waiting to blow beans all over the ceiling. (I may or may not have experienced first hand what happens when the pressure regulator comes off while pressure cooking beans…just as I may or may not have seen someone mop the ceiling.)

When preference takes over, we forget that the point of the church is the fulfillment of the great commission. This is our function. This is what we are designed for. When the means with which we accomplish that mission become more important than the mission itself, there will inevitably be fights, bickering, backlash, power grabbing and eventually division, strive, discord and ultimately the loss of influence in society.

Yes, there are other functions and activities that the church is supposed to do besides the great commission. But, if you’ll read Paul’s words carefully, you’ll also notice that the point of those functions is for the building up of the body. Those are the things we do to prepare us to do what we have been built to do.

This is where my concern for the church is exacerbated. This isn’t just a bump in the road for us. There is potential massive decline ahead of us. The baby boomer generation has begun to retire. Generation X is a smaller generation, by number, and have, in large part already left the church. And if we thought the church was struggling now, just imagine how it will be in 10-20 years when many of the boomers are gone. Now is the time to sound the alarm.

This means that our hope (as it has always been) lies solely is in reaching the next generations.

Too many churches have caused too much pain and sent a lot of people away from the church. For those who left because their preferences weren’t being met, I’m not that concerned. But for those who left because they didn’t want to be around those fighting for preference, I am greatly concerned. And as long as we’re focused on fighting to preserve what was relevant for us, we make the gospel and the church all about the preferences of those who are already in. And I don’t see that anywhere in scripture.

May I be frank for a moment and speak to my fellow Christians who are clinging to a means instead of mission? For the sake of the next generation, please let go. Please find it in yourself to become the support for the leaders of today’s church who are trying to reach the church of tomorrow. Don’t make their life miserable by clinging to your means. Make their life joyous by fighting for mission.

And if you’re a leader who is clinging to the means of of the past, for the sake of the mission that you once believed in – the mission that was at one time the passion that drove you to pursue ministry – please either get back on mission or get out of the way. (That may sound a little harsh, but I’m a pastor so I feel a little more freedom to speak sternly to my co-laborers.)

But, the pendulum has swung too far.

Just as the church has been greatly sidetracked by an outdated means of ministry, there is a completely separate faction that has swung to the opposite extreme. The extreme of cool.

Relevance is important. But cool does not equal relevant. Sometimes those are the methods that are relevant. But if the end goal is to be cool and hip, then we’ve lost track of mission too.

All the lights and video in the world will not necessarily make you relevant. If you don’t focus on mission, it doesn’t matter how cool your church is because you won’t be changing lives. You’ll just be attracting a crowd.

And there have been just as many casualties of cool as there were of outdated means. The church has sacrificed a great many souls on the altar of cool. If you are pursuing the coolest thing because that’s what’s cool, you’re not doing much better. And we will drive off just as many people.

What is the answer? How do we regain our influence?

It’s really quite simple. If we want to be heard, if we want to have influence, if we want to see a move of God, all we have to do is what we’ve been told to do. The mission.

We’ve lost our influence because we have exchanged mission for preference. We’ve lost our influence because we’ve sacrificed mission for our own selfish pursuits and pleasures. We are no longer credible because we’ve elevated ourselves over the work that Jesus did. I don’t know about you, but I’m so far from perfect and have made far too many mistakes to be the one who decides what the mission should be. We cannot allow ourselves in our imperfections to overthrow the mission. And if we can’t get back to that, we will never be heard.

Is relevance important? Yes. Is it more important than mission? I don’t think that’s the right question.

The question is, does the great commission require relevance?

18 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

At first, my answer to that question was, “no.” But upon further study I have found that I was wrong. It’s not explicit in the text, but it is implicit. In a few ways.

1. All authority in heaven and on earth. 

If Jesus has been given all authority in heaven and on earth, aside from the apparent, could it not also imply that Jesus’ authority coupled with Jesus presence empowers us to accomplish the mission in whatever method is necessary?

I’m not talking sinful methods. I’m not talking manipulative methods. But, within what is useful for building the kingdom, doesn’t Jesus’ authority cover all manner of preference?

2. Make Disciples

What is necessary if you’re going to make disciples? You have to have people to disciple. If the people who are available for us to disciple can only be reached through a method that is different than our own preference, doesn’t that mean we need to change our method to even have the opportunity to disciple them?

Our most important task as followers of Jesus Christ is to make disciples. It is not to make ourselves comfortable. If making disciples requires us to be a little uncomfortable, then our job is set comfort aside so that we may receive the title of “good and faithful servant.”

3. Teach them to obey. 

A part of making disciples is teaching. We have to teach people to obey Jesus’ commands. Does this require relevance? Well, have you ever tried to get children to listen to a long lecture? Have you ever tried to teach adults using sock puppets? I have. And because of that, I know that relevance is a requirement of teaching. Even more so if we are teaching for the purpose of obedience. It’s one thing to teach to dispense information. It’s something else entirely to teach for obedience.

I think the gospel is the most relevant message of all time. Its relevance transcends time. Christ died to save sinners. It doesn’t matter where you live, it doesn’t matter what language you speak. It doesn’t matter how old you are. If you’re a sinner, Christ died to save you.

If the gospel is the most relevant message of all time, why have we worked so hard to disguise it beneath to many layers of personal preference?

How do we save the church?

I hope that’s an alarming statement. It should be alarming because the church technically shouldn’t need to be saved. And yet it does. It needs to be saved from its continued pursuit of tarnishing the gospel of grace with things that have nothing to do with it.

But, the church needs some help.

I could be wrong. Definitely been wrong before. But it just seems that the trend is intensifying and with people not feeling societal pressure to be religious, they wont’ put up with irrelevance for much longer. They’ll just be done.

With the decline we have seen in the church’s influence, we don’t have the luxury of being irrelevant. We coasted for a long time because we had influence. But, those days are gone.

If we are going to change the world we live in, we have to live as those who are different. We have to have been changed by grace. We have to believe in the mission and give our lives for it. Our lukewarmness is what has made us unpalatable to the unbelieving world around us.

I guess the question is, do we believe enough to put mission first? If not, we have some repentance ahead of us.

And if we’re not willing to repent of our preferential ways, we should neither be surprised when our churches shut down.

We don’t get to forsake the mission. The mission is the most important thing. And we must do everything we can to fulfill it. Even if that means giving up things that are precious to us. Even if that means putting our preferences aside. Because, is it really worth holding on to your preference if it keeps someone from hearing the most relevant message of all time?

If we saw the mission of being the church as the most important thing, I don’t think we would care what the means are that we use to share that message. But by either fighting to retain what was relevant to us when we found Christ, but is no longer relevant to current and future generations or by dismissing the need for relevance as worldly we silence our own voice.

The saving grace for the church is to speak up. But not with protests and preferences. The way we speak up is to live out the mission. The way we speak up is to make the great commission the most important thing for us and our churches. Setting preference aside, let us press on to take hold of that for which Christ Jesus took hold of us.

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Posted on Nov 29, 2012 in Dear Leader, Leadership

Dear Optimistic Leader

Dear Optimistic Leader

(To read more letters to leaders, Click here)

Do you have a letter you want to write? Do you have a letter you’re too scared to write? Contact me!

Dear Optimistic Leader,

Thank you! You are such a rare gift. We need you so much more than you know. Every day we are bombarded with criticism and negativity. We see in TV shows, commercials, the News, tweets and facebook.

We’re so prone to be negative that it seems impossible to overcome the tendencies we have towards it. Yet, you do it every day! Even on your worst day, you’re more optimistic than many of us on our best days.

You are a blessing. When the sky is falling, you are thankful for the new opportunities that lie ahead. When you run out of money, you are thankful for the chance to learn through the tough time. When life gives you lemons, you make lemonade Slurpees and give them away.

Whatever you do, don’t stop. When people come along and criticize you for being to optimistic, please don’t listen. For some reason, people think being negative and critical makes them look smart. How absurd is it that people criticize you for being negative. Instead, let it be motivation to be even more optimistic.

The world doesn’t change on the backs of the pessimist. The world changes because someone like you believes we can make the world a better place. You are a world changer.

When we interact with you, you not only bring a smile to our face, you move us from our own negativity to a place of hope.

So, thank you again for being optimistic. Thank you for teaching us to hope. Thank you for brightening our day and teaching us to see the light in the world around us.

We couldn’t do it without you!

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Posted on Oct 25, 2012 in Dear Leader, Leadership

Dear Pessimistic Leader

Dear Pessimistic Leader

(To read more letters to leaders, Click here)

Do you have a letter you want to write? Do you have a letter you’re too scared to write? Contact me!

Dear Pessimistic Leader,

First let me apologize. I don’t know all of what you’ve gone through, but I do know some of it. I’m sure it hasn’t been easy. I know that a lot of what you have endured has led to where and who you are right now. I know that it is because of imperfect people like you and me that you feel the way you do. And for that I apologize. For whatever has been done to you or said about you, I’m sorry.

Second, I know a lot of things have gone wrong for you. I know you’ve seen a lot of bad things happen, and you don’t have hope that good things will just naturally happen. People are messed up, so why should we expect anything good from them? However, just because people are messed up and we have a track record of bad with you, does that mean nothing good will ever come of us?

Don’t give up on hope. It doesn’t seem like there is any kind of hope to hold on to at the moment. I understand that. But giving up on hope is almost like giving up all together.

You see, we’re all holding on to hope for you. We are all hoping that you will slowly, but surely, regain some of the hope that you once had. We are deeply concerned for you. We hope that you will find some optimism somewhere and that it will leak over into your leadership of us.

You may not realize it, but your pessimism makes it very hard for us to stay optimistic. We try. We come it meetings and interactions with you, having had a great day, but not long after the meeting begins we hear about all the negative things in your life and our day begins to go down hill.

We look to you to lead us, and where you lead us we often follow. That means if you lead us into pessimism we will go there. We beg you to lead us to a more hopeful and optimistic future!

We’re not really sure why you’re negative, from our perspective you seem to have it pretty good. Are you just negative to bring us down so you can control us? Is there some other benefit you receive from negativity? We all face challenges, but that doesn’t mean we have to be pessimistic about them. [tweetherder]In fact, we think optimism in the face of challenges gives us the best chance to overcome. [/tweetherder]

We hold on to hope for you. We believe that there is a positive, optimistic you that is just waiting to get out. We long for that. We dream of working in an environment full of hopes and dreams. We dream of an environment where nothing is impossible, where all ideas are welcome and achievable. We want to be a part of something great, and we know that the only way to get there is to dream.

Won’t you join us?

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Posted on Oct 18, 2012 in Dear Leader, Leadership

Dear Disgruntled Leader

Dear Disgruntled Leader

(This is the second letter in a series I’m writing called “Dear Leader.” You can find the first letter here. As you read, I invite you to think about what you would say, and then leave your response in the comment section below!)

I know you’ve come across them, you may even be one. If you aren’t, then you probably know one. You might even work for one. They are completely unhappy with everything about their current situation, and they let you and everyone around them know by constantly complaining about it.

In one my first leadership experiences, I experienced this greatly. I had someone who had been working for the organization for many years, working over me. Not long after I had started working there, he came into my office and started complaining about all the things he didn’t like. And I went there with him. For the next few years we would share with each other just how much we didn’t like this or that.

This is a habit I am still struggling with today. It’s so easy to become this guy. Complaining is easy. Negativity is easy. But it’s something I’ve been constantly working on improving about myself since I left.

There is nothing to be gained by being negative, complaining about everything doesn’t help at all.

This letter is to you (and me):

Dear Disgruntled Leader,

I don’t know what happened to you to make you feel this way. I don’t know why you’re so unhappy about everything around here. I’m sure you have your reasons, and I’m sure you’d tell me if I asked. The problem is, I know more than I ever wanted to know. Your constant complaining has made it very clear that you don’t like working here, and that you don’t like any of us who work with you.

We know you are annoyed with the systems, of which you constantly seem to be victimized. We know you are disappointed and dissatisfied, by the slow pace of change. We experience it all.

What you may not know is that it’s easy for you to bring us down. It’s easy for your cynicism and negativity to greatly affect our attitude and our ability to do our jobs well. The more you complain about the place we are devoting our lives to, the harder it becomes for us to make the sacrifices necessary to bring the change we all want to see.

There are things we really want to say to you, but we resist the impulse for fear of becoming the target of your next rant. Our first response is that we just want you to leave. The cynicism and negativity you bring don’t outweigh the good you do. You bring us down with you, and we’re tired of being victims of it all.

However, since you’re probably not going to stay, could you please find it in yourself to bring the negativity to a minimum. Maybe it would help if you saw a counselor, someone who could help you walk through some of the things you are experiencing.

What we really want for you, is what we want for our organization – restoration. We believe in what we do. That’s why we’re here. We think you do to, but it’s hard to see that through the cloud of malcontent we are so used to seeing you wear. We will give you the benefit of the doubt if you give us a reason to believe you are trying. We will support you if you’re honest with us, and tell us that this is something you are struggling with. But if you never share your personal struggles with us, we can’t help.

You have so much to offer, and we know you do. We know you know it too. Let us help you see it again. Let us help you see the hope, that though things aren’t how they should be, we can be the ones who take it there. If you let us.

Let us.

 

 

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